1. When Toyota switched away from using plastic or glass-based inulation in favor of soy, it invited in some very unwelcome Toyota loyalisits.

    According to the plaintiff, she learned the hard way about the soy wiring when her Avalon wouldn't start and a look under the hood showed wires chewed, so she had the car towed to a dealer. Toyota told her rodents had caused the damage and it would be no problem to repair the problems as long as she could cough up $6,000 to cover the bill.

    The soy-based wiring is allegedly attracting in rodents, who love to chew it up and use it for nesting material. The lawsuit, Heidi Browder vs. Toyota Motor Corporation, et al. follows a similar lawsuit filed against Honda earlier this year.

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  2. A new lawsuit has a suggestion for Toyota.

    Maybe it's time to start calling their plug-in hybrid the _Prius Plug-in-every-few-miles. A Toyota Prius Plug-In mileage lawsuit has been filed concerning a 2012 Prius Plug-In that allegedly gets only 8 miles on a single battery charge. Plaintiff Richard Rosenbaum says he purchased the 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In to save gas when driving 12 miles for work, then discovered the car wouldn't travel that far on a single battery charge.

    We all know EPA estimates and MPG numbers posted by manufacturers are best case scenarios, often conducted in labs. But a 40% reduction (8 miles vs advertised 13) is a tough pill to swallow. Especially when one of the primary reasons for buying the car was to get to your job, 12 miles away, on one electric charge.…

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  3. The curtain shield airbags in your car have two chambers that are welded together.

    That weld keeps those chambers hugging and happy. The only problem is, someone did a really bad job welding 1.4 million Toyota vehicles worldwide. The bad welds are cracking and letting those chambers loosen their embrace in the Prius, Prius Plug-in, and Lexus CT 200h. If they pull too far apart and you get in an accident:…

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