A Prius Plug-in Mileage Lawsuit

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Tagged
#lawsuit #fuel-system
Source
carcomplaints.com
An overhead view of a parking lot with cars neatly lined up inside parking spaces.

A new lawsuit has a suggestion for Toyota. Maybe it's time to start calling their plug-in hybrid the _Prius Plug-in-every-few-miles. A Toyota Prius Plug-In mileage lawsuit has been filed concerning a 2012 Prius Plug-In that allegedly gets only 8 miles on a single battery charge. Plaintiff Richard Rosenbaum says he purchased the 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In to save gas when driving 12 miles for work, then discovered the car wouldn't travel that far on a single battery charge.

We all know EPA estimates and MPG numbers posted by manufacturers are best case scenarios, often conducted in labs. But a 40% reduction (8 miles vs advertised 13) is a tough pill to swallow. Especially when one of the primary reasons for buying the car was to get to your job, 12 miles away, on one electric charge.

Another interesting note:

"Rosenbaum says the gas engine must be used at temps below 55 degrees because of using the heater, with the gasoline engine allegedly needed to provide hot water for the car's heater."

That's something they probably don't mention in the brochure. We'll see how this one plays out.

More information on carcomplaints.com

Related Toyota Generations

At least one model year in these 1 generations have a relationship to this story.

We track this because a generation is just a group of model years where very little changes from year-to-year. Chances are owners throughout these generation will want to know about this news. Click on a generation for more information.

  1. 1st Generation Prius Plug-in

    Years
    2012–2015
    Reliability
    22nd of 81
    PainRank
    0.93
    Complaints
    8
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