1. When Toyota switched away from using plastic or glass-based inulation in favor of soy, it invited in some very unwelcome Toyota loyalisits.

    According to the plaintiff, she learned the hard way about the soy wiring when her Avalon wouldn't start and a look under the hood showed wires chewed, so she had the car towed to a dealer. Toyota told her rodents had caused the damage and it would be no problem to repair the problems as long as she could cough up $6,000 to cover the bill.

    The soy-based wiring is allegedly attracting in rodents, who love to chew it up and use it for nesting material. The lawsuit, Heidi Browder vs. Toyota Motor Corporation, et al. follows a similar lawsuit filed against Honda earlier this year.

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  2. In what must seem like cruel irony to owners who have had issues with unintended acceleration

    , Toyota's collision avoidance system is getting confused and randomly activating: The pre-collision system can interpret a steel joint or plate as an object in the road. The steel object will activate the collision avoidance system and identify the steel as a car driving in front of the Toyota or Lexus vehicle.

    About 31,000 cars are at risk of a sudden slam of the brakes. This includes the 2013-2015 Avalon and Avalon Hybrid as well as the Lexus ES 350 and ES 300h. Toyota doesn't have a solution other than to deactivate the system for now. A more permanent solution will likely involve a software patch. I'm sure Toyota dropped off a case of Red Bull, locked the door, and limited bathroom breaks for it's software development team until this is figured out.

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  3. A manufacturing error could lead to total steering loss in 5,650 Toyota cars from the 2014 model year.

    Toyota says a bolt hole in the left front lower suspension is much bigger than specifications allow. That means the bolt going through that hole can --- and most likely will --- loosen over time…

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