Latest Avalon Recall News

There's a lot of news out there, but not all of it matters. We try to boil down it to the most important bits about things that actually help you with your car problem. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. Poorly programmed control units have led to a Toyota airbag recall for 188,000 vehicles from the 2018-2019 model years.

    The automaker says the airbag electronic control units weren't programmed correctly, causing problems when the vehicles are started and the airbag sensors are disabled.

    Every airbag is attached to a control unit that monitors data from sensors and determines when the airbag should deploy. You can imagine how important it is that these control units are dialed in. Toyota forgot that whole part.

    keep reading
  2. How hot do you like your seat heater in the winter?

    If you like it really toasty — as in, with an actual flame — you’ll probably love one of 7,700 Toyota vehicles with seat heaters that catch on fire. The vehicles have been recalled because fire and cars don’t get along, what with their tanks of highly flammable liquids and all. All the affected vehicles are equipped with aftermarket accessory seat heaters that contain copper strand heating elements. The recall is being handled by Southeast Toyota Distributors (SET) which is the world’s largest distributor of Toyota and Scion vehicles.

    The recall is expected to begin on July 14, 2016 and the seat heaters will need to be disconnected. Owners will be reimbursed.

    keep reading
  3. The occupant classification system (OCS) in some 2016 Toyotas isn't doing a very good job classifying occupants.

    (Toyota) says 41,630 model year 2016 Camry sedans and 16,880 model year 2016 Avalon cars have front passenger airbags, including knee airbags, that can fail to deploy.

    So far there aren't many details about this recall, but Toyota will need to recalibrate the OCS soon. Watch your mailbox for an official notice.

    keep reading
  4. In what must seem like cruel irony to owners who have had issues with unintended acceleration

    , Toyota's collision avoidance system is getting confused and randomly activating: The pre-collision system can interpret a steel joint or plate as an object in the road. The steel object will activate the collision avoidance system and identify the steel as a car driving in front of the Toyota or Lexus vehicle.

    About 31,000 cars are at risk of a sudden slam of the brakes. This includes the 2013-2015 Avalon and Avalon Hybrid as well as the Lexus ES 350 and ES 300h. Toyota doesn't have a solution other than to deactivate the system for now. A more permanent solution will likely involve a software patch. I'm sure Toyota dropped off a case of Red Bull, locked the door, and limited bathroom breaks for it's software development team until this is figured out.

    keep reading
  5. Like something out of a bad music video, the subwoofers in the 2011-12 Toyota Avalons are catching on fire.

    The problem doesn't have anything to do with how loud you crank the volume or how many times your local station plays that Taylor Swift song -- although let's be honest, it could use a break[1]. Instead, it all comes down to the subwoofer's exposed wires. When something in your trunk slides around it can knock the speaker's wires out of position. Once that happens, if they come in contact with the woofer's metal frame you could be singing come on baby, light my fire on your next commute.…

    keep reading
  6. It's Friday, so in the immortal words of Loverboy I feel I can say that "everybody is working for the weekend."

    That is, unless you're one of the defective airbags in over 2.1 million vehicles. Those suckers don't work at all. The airbags have a nasty tendency of randomly deploying due to electrical noise and have been recalled. If that sounds familiar, it's because they've been recalled before. Unfortunately 40 of the recalled vehicles still had a random deployment after they were "fixed", according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). That's unacceptable, even by government standards.…

    keep reading
  7. A manufacturing error could lead to total steering loss in 5,650 Toyota cars from the 2014 model year.

    Toyota says a bolt hole in the left front lower suspension is much bigger than specifications allow. That means the bolt going through that hole can --- and most likely will --- loosen over time…

    keep reading

See All Avalon News